Archive for the ‘ICNA and Zakat’ Category

The following was found on the Islamic Circle of North America explaining who Shar’ ia permits to receive Zakat. H/T The Counter Jihad Report. The Qur’ an specifically enumerates who may receive zakat in At-Taubah 9:60:

“As-Sadaqat (here it means Zakat) are only for the Fuqara’ (poor), and Al-Masakin (the poor) and those employed to collect (the funds); and for to attract the hearts of those who have been inclined (towards Islam); and to free the captives; and for those in debt; and for Allah’s Cause (i.e. for Mujahidun – those fighting in the holy wars), and for the wayfarer (a traveller who is cut off from everything); a duty imposed by Allah. And Allah is All-Knower, All-Wise.”

There are two things to keep in mind. First, ICNA has a ICNA Relief USA is considered fi-Sabilillah which means the zakat can be used by the entire organization. In addition, CAIR has been declared fi-Sabilillah which refers to beneficial works and projects that are of common benefit to the ummah: http://www.cair.com/Zakat.aspx. ICNA is correct that zakat can be used for jihad and interestingly, CAIR quotes At-Taubah 9:60 as well to justify its position as zakat worthy.

________________________________________

Who is entitled to receive Zakat?
There are eight groups of people on whom Zakat should be spent, as mentioned in the Quran:
“The alms are only for the Fuqara’ (the poor), and Al-Masakin (the needy) and those employed to collect (the funds); and for to attract the hearts of those who have been inclined (towards Islam); and to free the captives; and for those in debt; and for Allah’s Cause, and for the wayfarer (a traveler who is cut off from everything); a duty imposed by Allah. And Allah is All-Knower, All-Wise.” [Al-Quran 9:60]
“They ask you as to what they should spend. Say: Whatever wealth you spend, it is for the parents and the near of kin and the orphans and the needy and the wayfarer, and whatever good you do, Allah surely knows it.” [Al-Quran 2:215]
“(Alms are) for the poor who are confined in the way of Allah– they cannot go about in the land; the ignorant man thinks them to be rich on account of (their) abstaining (from begging); you can recognize them by their mark; they do not beg from men importunately; and whatever good thing you spend, surely Allah knows it.” [Al-Quran 2:273]
 “And give to the near of kin his due and (to) the needy and the wayfarer, and do not squander wastefully.” [Al-Quran 17:26]
1. Fuqaraa: Those who own property in excess of basic necessities but below the value of Nisab.
2. Masakeen: Persons of extreme poverty who possess no wealth whatsoever.
3. Aamileen: (Zakat collector) Those persons who are appointed by an Islamic Head of State or Government to collect Zakat. It is not necessary that this be a needy person.
4. Muallafatul Quloob: Those poor and needy persons who are given Zakat with the intentions of solidifying their hearts because they maybe recently converted to Islam or to bring them closer to Islam.
5. Ar-Riqaab: slaves whose maters have agreed to set them free on a payment of a fixed amount. Zakat may be used to purchase their freedom.
6. Ibnus-Sabeel: A traveler, who, whilst wealthy at his residence, is stranded and in need of financial assistance.
7. Al Ghaarimeen: A person whose debts exceeds his assets and his net assets (after deducting his liabilities) is below the Nisab limit. To determine whether a person qualifies, his basic necessities of life (house, furniture, clothes, vehicle, etc.) will not be taken into account. It is conditional that the debts were not created for any un-Islamic or sinful purpose.
8. Fi Sabeelillah: Those who are away from home in the path of Allah. Those in Jihaad, those seeking knowledge or a stranded Haji may be assist with Zakat if they are in need.
Who cannot be given Zakat?
1. Zakat cannot be given to parents, grandfather, etc., or to one’s children and grandchildren. A husband and wife cannot give Zakat to each other.
2. Zakat contributions cannot be given to such institutions or organizations who do not give the rightful recipients (Masaarif) possession of Zakat, but instead use Zakat funds for construction, investment or salaries.
3. Zakat cannot be given to non-Muslims. The same ruling applies to Waajib Sadaqah, i.e., Sadaqatul Fitr, Kaffarah, Ush’r and Naz’r. Naf’l Sadaqah could be given to non-Muslims.
4. If one cannot determine whether the recipient is needy or not, then it is better to make certain before giving him Zakat. If Zakat is given without inquiry and subsequently it is known that the recipient is wealthy the Zakat is not valid. It has to be given again.
5. Zakat will not be fulfilled by purchasing books for an institution, or land purchased for public utility and made Wak’f.
6. Zakat cannot be used for the Kaf’n of a deceased person who has no heirs, because at that time he/she cannot become the owner.
7. A dead person’s debt cannot be paid from Zakat.

Miscellaneous

1. It is not permissible according to Shariah to give Zakat to a person who owns merchandise or wealth in excess of his needs to the value of Nisab nor is it permissible for such a person to accept Zakat.
2. A person that does not own an amount equal to the value of Nisab is known as Faqir. This person could be given Zakat and it is permissible for him to accept it.
3. If a person owns wealth which in value exceeds the amount of Nisab, but this wealth is not intended for business nor does he require it for his daily needs, such a person is regarded as well-to-do and should not be given Zakat.
4. The books of a scholar or tools of a tradesman are among his necessities, irrespective of their value. Besides these if he does not own wealth equal to Nisab, he could be given Zakat.
5. When giving Zakat, Sadaqah, etc., one’s poor and needy relatives should be given preference. To avoid embarrassing them, it should be given to them without saying that it is Zakat or Sadaqah.
6. There is great thawab (reward) in giving Zakat to poor persons who are striving in the way of the Deen or those who are engaged in religious knowledge, or to religious institutions where poor or needy students are being cared for. Care should be taken that only such institutions are given Zakat where it is used according to the Shariah.
7. A child of a wealthy father cannot be given Zakat. When such a child becomes mature in age, and does not own wealth to the value of Nisab, he may then be given Zakat.
8. Zakat can be given to: brother, sister, nephew, niece (brothers’ and sisters’ children), uncle, aunt (both paternal and maternal), step-grandfather, step-grandmother, father-in-law, and mother-in-law.
Copyright (c) 2008 Zakat Calculator. Arif Jameel | Design by David HerremanMonday, April 16, 2012Source: http://icnarelief.org/site/index.php

___________________________________________________________

Does CAIR Qualify to Recieve Zakat?

About Islam and American Muslims

Yes.  Numerous Muslim scholars have confirmed that Zakat is payable to organizations that exist to serve the Muslim community by protecting their rights. This is because the work done by CAIR (and other such organizations) can be classified as fi-sabilillah, which is one of the eight categories of Zakat recipients detailed in the Quran (Chapter 9, Verse 60).

Islamic scholar Sheikh Ahmad Kutty a senior lecturer and Islamic scholar at the Islamic Institute of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, states:

“I think it is not only permissible, rather it is also imperative that we do give our zakah to organizations like CAIR and CAIR-CAN, since they are fulfilling a most timely and essential service for the healthy survival of the community. Supporting such institutions clearly falls under the legitimate objectives of zakah as expounded by authentic scholars and jurists of Islam, both of the past and the present.

The categories of recipients of zakah are stated in the following verse: “Charities are (meant) only for the poor and the needy, and those who are charged with collecting them, and those whose hearts are to be won over, and for the freeing of human beings from bondage, and (for) those who are overburdened with debts, and (for those who strive) in Allah’s cause (fi sabili-llah), and (for) the way-farer: (this is) an ordinance from Allah—and Allah is All-Knowing and All-Wise” (At-Tawbah: 60).

As is clear from the above verse, one of the categories is fi sabili-llah. … among the commentators of the Qur’an (mufassirun) as well as the jurists (fuqaha’), who have used the term fi sabili-llah in a far wider sense, thus extending it to include all beneficial works and projects that are of common benefit to the Ummah. They have thus included in this category such services as funeral arrangements, building and taking care of schools and mosques, establishing hospitals, building bridges, etc. In short, they definitely include institutions that provide educational or social services under this category and thus eligible to receive funds from zakah.

A principle of jurisprudence states: if a thing which has been considered as obligatory cannot be fulfilled without fulfilling another, then fulfilling the latter also becomes obligatory. Thus since protecting the rights of Muslims and empowering Muslims cannot be achieved without such institutions, it is imperative that Muslims support and maintain such institutions.

Muslims should have no hesitation in giving part of their Zakah to CAIR or CAIR-CAN, which is providing a most timely and essential service for the cause of Islam and Muslims. They both have a reputation for professionalism, efficiency, commitment, and integrity, which in my mind are the most valuable assets of any Islamic organization worthy of the name.

May Allah give us all the honor of serving His cause efficiently and professionally, and may He also accept our humble efforts in His cause. Ameen.”

Sheikh Ahmad Kutty is a well known Islamic Scholar, a regular commentator on Islamic issues and makes fatwas on issues of importance to Muslims.

Shiekh Ahmad Kutty’s Biography:
Born in Kerala State, India (1946)
Nationality: Canadian